Enzymes - The Breakdown

by Jodi Shabazz May 24, 2018

Enzymes That Work on Specific Food Types or Compounds

Specific enzymes work on specific foods. You need the right type of enzyme for the foods you want it to break down. Think of the foods you have problems with and then choose a product that contains at least those types of enzymes. Here is a list of the common enzyme types and foods they act on.

Digestive enzymes are enzymes that break down food into usable material. The major different types of digestive enzymes are:

Amylases - breaks down carbohydrates, starches, and sugars which are prevalent in potatoes, fruits, vegetables, and many snack foods

Lactase - breaks down lactose (milk sugars)
Diastase - digests vegetable starch
Sucrase - digests complex sugars and starches
Maltase - digests disaccharides to monosaccharides (malt sugars)
Invertase - breaks down sucrose (table sugar)
Glucoamylase - breaks down starch to glucose
Alpha-glactosidase - facilitates digestion of beans, legumes, seeds, roots, soy products, and underground stems
Proteases - breaks down proteins found in meats, nuts, eggs, and cheese

Pepsin - breaks down proteins into peptides
Peptidase - breaks down small peptide proteins to amino acids
Trypsin - derived from animal pancreas, breaks down proteins
Alpha - chymotrypsin, an animal-derived enzyme, breaks down proteins
Bromelain - derived from pineapple, breaks down a broad spectrum of proteins, has antiinflammatory properties, effective over very wide pH range.
Papain - derived from raw papaya, broad range of substrates and pH, works well breaking down small and large proteins

Lipase - breaks down fats found in most dairy products, nuts, oils, and meat
Cellulase - breaks down cellulose, plant fiber; not found in humans

Other Enzymes

Betaine HCL - increases the hydrochloric acid content of the upper digestive system; activates the protein digesting enzyme pepsin in the stomach (does not influence plant- or fungal-derived enzymes)
CereCalase - a unique cellulase complex from National Enzyme Company that maximizes fiber and cereal digestion and absorption of essential minerals; an exclusive blend of synergistic phytase, hemicellulase, and beta-glucanase
Endoprotease - cleaves peptide bonds from the interior of peptide chains
Exoprotease - cleaves off amino acids from the ends of peptide chains
Extract of ox bile - an animal-derived enzyme, stimulates the intestine to move
Fructooligosaccharides (FOS) - helps support the growth of friendly intestinal microbes, also inhibits the growth of harmful species
L-glutamic acid - activates the protein digesting enzyme pepsin in the stomach
lysozyme - an animal-derived enzyme, and a component of every lung cell; lysozyme is very important in the control of infections, attacks invading bacterial and viruses
Papayotin - from papaya
Pancreatin - an animal-derived enzyme, breaks down protein and fats
Pancrelipase - an animal-derived enzyme, breaks down protein, fats, and carbohydrates
Pectinase - breaks down the pectin in fruit
Phytase - digests phytic acid, allows minerals such as calcium, zinc, copper, manganese, etc. to be more available by the body, but does not break down any food proteins
Xylanase - breaks down xylan sugars, works well with grains such as corn
Other general terms for enzymes referring to their general action instead of specific action

Endopeptidase: Enzymes that cleave proteins only on the inside
Exopeptidase: Enzymes that cleave proteins only on the outside (terminal) part
Aminopeptidase: Exopeptidase that cleaves at the amino terminating end
Carboxypeptidase: Exopeptidase that cleaves at the carboxy terminating end

 

Source: https://www.biomediclabs.com/enzyme_breakdown





Jodi Shabazz
Jodi Shabazz

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